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Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott #2020

Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott By Mark Abley Conversations with a Dead Man The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott As a poet and citizen deeply concerned by the Oka Crisis the Idle No More protests and Canada s ongoing failure to resolve First Nations issues Montreal author Mark Abley has long been haunted by t
  • Title: Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott
  • Author: Mark Abley
  • ISBN: 9781553656098
  • Page: 200
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott By Mark Abley As a poet and citizen deeply concerned by the Oka Crisis, the Idle No More protests, and Canada s ongoing failure to resolve First Nations issues, Montreal author Mark Abley has long been haunted by the figure of Duncan Campbell Scott, known both as the architect of Canada s most destructive Aboriginal policies and as one of the nation s major poets Who was this enigmaticAs a poet and citizen deeply concerned by the Oka Crisis, the Idle No More protests, and Canada s ongoing failure to resolve First Nations issues, Montreal author Mark Abley has long been haunted by the figure of Duncan Campbell Scott, known both as the architect of Canada s most destructive Aboriginal policies and as one of the nation s major poets Who was this enigmatic figure who could compose a sonnet to an Onondaga Madonna one moment and promote a final solution to the Indian problem the next In this passionate, intelligent and highly readable inquiry into the state of Canada s troubled Aboriginal relations, Abley alternates between analysis of current events and an imagined debate with the spirit of Duncan Campbell Scott, whose defense of the Indian Residential School and belief in assimilation illuminate the historical roots underlying today s First Nations struggles.
    Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott By Mark Abley
    • [☆ Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Mark Abley]
      200 Mark Abley
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      Posted by:Mark Abley
      Published :2020-01-13T09:06:24+00:00

    About "Mark Abley"

    1. Mark Abley

      Mark Abley was born in England in 1955 As a small child his family moved to Canada, and he grew up in northern Ontario, southern Alberta and central Saskatchewan He studied literature at the University of Saskatchewan and, after winning a Rhodes Scholarship, at St John s College, Oxford As a young man Mark travelled in than twenty countries in Europe and Asia Aspiring to be a poet, he began work as a freelance writer.In 1983 Mark and his wife moved to Montreal His first book, Beyond Forget Rediscovering the Prairies, appeared in 1986 A year later he embarked on the adventure of parenthood and also joined the staff of the Montreal Gazette He spent sixteen years there, working as a feature writer, book review editor and literary columnist His reviews and articles won him the National Newspaper Award for critical writing, and, following a trip to Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somaliland, he was nominated for an NNA in international reporting Along the way he also wrote three books of poetry and the text of a children s picture book, Ghost Cat He returned to freelance writing in 2003, though he continues to write a regular column on language for the Gazette It appears every second Saturday under the headline Watchwords His book Spoken Here Travels Among Threatened Languages appeared in 2003 It has been translated into French, Spanish and Japanese, and earned praise from reviewers in many countries But the responses that most delighted Mark came from readers who said that the book inspired them to keep fighting for their own language and culture After winning a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2005, Mark began work on a project looking at the amazing changes in the spoken and written language of our time from hip hop to Singlish, text messaging to Spanglish The result is his 2008 book The Prodigal Tongue Dispatches From the Future of English.His latest book, Camp Fossil Eyes Digging for the Origins of Words, appeared in the summer of 2009 from Annick Press It aims to make etymology the history of words accessible and intriguing to children between about 9 and 13 Much to Mark s surprise, it was recently translated into Korean After this book appeared, he accepted an offer from McGill Queen s University Press to work there part time as an acquisition editor.Mark has been a writer, an editor and a guest speaker in the Creative Non Fiction program of the Banff Centre for the Arts he has read from his work at festivals and universities in Japan, Britain, the United States and most provinces of Canada Despite his dislike of winter he continues to live in suburban Montreal, a few minutes walk from the banks of the St Lawrence River He is married with two daughters and three cats.

    640 Comments

    1. Duncan Campbell Scott was the first superintendent of Canadian residential schools and a deputy minister of Indian Affairs in the early part of the 20th century He was also a talented poet, who often turned to Canada s First Nations peoples or Indians as they were known in his day for inspiration Abley s book explores the intriguing question of how one man could be both a sensitive poet, and a cold hearted civil servant who sought to enforce, in Scott s own words, a final solution to the Indian [...]


    2. A biography of a fascinating man made interesting by its device of bringing him back to life to defend his actions, which seem so indefensible by today s standards The sections reviewing some of Scott s milestones, poems, and policy decisions shed light on the man and the thinking behind some of Canada s most brutal colonial policies The conversations between the author, Abley, and the subject, Scott, were an effective way to understand the broader cultural context in which Scott operated and v [...]


    3. Mark Abley has written a fabulous book on the life of Duncan Campbell Scott,one of the most reviled men in Canadian history He was Minister of Indian Affairs in the early 20th century and Aboriginals blame him for the plight of our First Nations community to this day He was responsible for the residential school system that wreaked havoc in the lives of Aboriginal families I believe that this book should be read by every Canadian in order to better understand our history and to support Canada s [...]


    4. It took me a really long time to finish this book The first chapter had me absolutely captivated, but unfortunately the rest of the book sort of dragged on I loved the idea of bringing someone s ghost in to tell their own story it s such a unique way of writing creative nonfiction However, the majority of the book was not told through conversation, but from plain history I ll admit that the history sections were less dry than textbook writing, but they definitely weren t can t put it down kind o [...]


    5. Abley s approach was, I think, a good choice, particularly from the perspective of an eductor in an era when we are making an effort to balance hindsight with understanding of contextual perspective and encourage students to think critically about both as analytical lenses through which to consider historical events Although Abley does engage is some speculation in the process of creating the dialogue between himself and the shade of Duncan Campbell Scott, the author has done his research meticu [...]


    6. A grave and moving account of the facts surrounding the Canadian Aboriginal residential school system, this book is a tough read, palatable only because of the wit and smart narrative structure with which the writer graces it It s tough because it s a no holds barred look at the devastation and the rationale for same, that was wreaked upon the Aboriginals by the authors of The Indian Act and, particularly, Duncan Campbell Scott, architect of the residential school system Yet, there is wit, grac [...]


    7. Interesting format used This is an essay discussing Canada s First Nations Residential Schools, Canadian Government policy, assimilation, plus Truth and Reconciliation, intermixed with an engaging modern dialogue between the author and Duncan Campbell Scott, who died in 1947 Scott was the head of the Department of Indian Affairs, besides being a poet and writer Abley did a fine job with his research and presentation.


    8. I found the book worth reading for the interesting info about Duncan Campbell Scott and the context he lived in Indian Act, Indian Residential Schools and the imperialism and racism of his time The conversations that the author had with Scott were a bit clumsy, I thought, and that aspect of the book didn t work for me Interesting idea, tho.





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